Safecast Seaweed Collection Feasibility Study

It is known that much of the radiation from the Fukushima incident — about 80% — went into the ocean, and while this would appear to be good for land dwellers, what is not known for certain is how much of that radiation is making its way into the food chain. Seaweed, which is consumed by people as well as some of the creatures that people eat, would appear to be a good place to look for concentrations of radiation.  Marco Kaltofen of Worcester Polytechnic Institute kindly offered to run a range of tests on any seaweed samples we sent him.

Map description: The red markers indicate stops were made with no sample collected, green, samples were collected. Mousing over (or clicking) on the markers will bring up a short description and picture(s).
Collection Location Map link
Although seaweed is usually collected by boat, Safecasters Jonathan Wilder and Jeremy Hedley drove north from Tokyo to Fukushima over the 2014 Spring Equinox weekend to collect as many samples as possible from shore, whether they were growing on rocks, washed up on the beach, or being sold as food in souvenir shops. Their brief was to find out whether valid samples for a Safecast project aiming to test for radioactivity in seaweed collected at one kilometer intervals, 200 kilometers north and south of the Dai-ichi nuclear plant, could be collected efficiently from land.
01-IMG_8163
Much of the coast was under reconstruction. Seaweed could be seen at many locations but was mostly inaccessible due to a high tide early on the collection day, high waves the entire day, and physical barriers to the water.
02-IMG_8157
The first location seaweed could be collected required a 1.5-meter jump down to the slippery tetrapods. It was tricky collection work with one hand both scraping the sea lettuce off and scooping it into the bag which was held in the other hand….
03-IMG_8161
…before a wave washed the scrapings away.
03-IMG_8161
We saw very little seaweed washed up on shore. This amount, washed up and collected from about a 50-meter stretch of beach, was nowhere near the 280 grams of wet seaweed needed for a single sample and was abandoned.
03-IMG_8161
At a brand new port, so new that no boats were tied up yet…
03-IMG_8161
…we thought we had found a great sample floating in the water.
One option was for one of us to jump into the water to retrieve it, but from this spot there was no way back out except for a long, forbidding swim in cold turbulent waters around to a ladder.
We wished we had brought a wetsuit and fins or a gaff, which we had imagined would be useful before we left on this expedition, or long secateurs, pruning shears. Lacking those, but in true Safecast spirit, we then looked around the port to see what we could scrounge to help with snagging the seaweed. We didn’t have much hope of finding anything, because the port area was clean; there were no nets, traps, gaffs, the things that one might expect to see lying around. Nothing was there except a pair of old boots and… a long bamboo pole (top left corner) with a long piece of string attached at one end and weighted with a piece of rebar on the other. To us, at the moment of realizing what we had found, it was unbelievable there would be a device lying around that could be exactly the thing that would work… Unfortunately, the seaweed was too securely rooted to the bottom to be pulled up.
03-IMG_8161
Near the end of our first day of collection, after many mostly fruitless stops, we were treated to some classic Japanese scenery (not to say that the scenery had been unimpressive all day long), however, like many places that day, the seaweed was inaccessible. It was prohibited to cross the bridge to the island most likely because the railing (right) which had been destroyed by the March 2011 tsunami had yet to be repaired. Nonetheless, the bridge was crossed, seaweed was visible, but high seas again prevented collection.
03-IMG_8161
On day two, the weather was pristine and the waters calmer. (Still, seawall construction was evident.) Seaweed could not be collected from this location.
03-IMG_8161
Seaweed collection was relatively easy from this location with only occasional waves washing over the half-buried tetrapod.
03-IMG_8161
From this boat ramp, two samples were collected, one growing at the far end and the other scattered about on the boat ramp, possibly washed in from a seaweed farm.
03-IMG_8161
By the end of the two days, 10 samples were collected from 16% of the stops. They were then dried and shipped to Marco Kaltofen for testing. Preliminary results: “Samples were evenly split between low (single digit Bq/kg) and not detected.”  We’ll update this blog post when the entire series of tests is complete.
As for the feasibility of shore collection, even during a different season, or without heavy seas, it was concluded that collection could be more efficiently accomplished by boat.
by Jonathan Wilder
Links:
The full report
Feasibility Study — Seaweed sample collection Protocol
Sample Tracker
Collection Environment
=================福島第一原発の事故で放出された放射能の大半は(約80%とも言われています)、海に流失したというのは既知の事実ですが、地上にで生活している者にとって、これは不幸中の幸いであったかもしれません。そして、その放射能が食物連鎖の中に入り込んできているのかどうか、確実なことは分かっていません。
海藻は人間だけでなく、いろんな生き物たちも食べるので、食品の放射線量を測るうえで適材かと思います。 ウースター工科大学のマルコ・カルトフェン先生のご厚意により、我々が採取した海藻サンプルを使って様々な検査を実施してもらいました。

地図の説明:赤いマーカーで記された所はサンプルの採取ではなく停止した地点で、緑色の印がサンプル採取の行われた地点となります。各マーカーの上をなぞるようにマウスを移動させると(あるいはマーカーをクリックすると)、簡単な説明と画像が表示されるようになっています。
採取場所の地図リンク
海藻は通常、船に乗って沖へ出てから採取しますが、セーフキャスターのジョナサン・ワイルダーとジェレミー・ヘッドリーは、2014年、春分の日の週末に東京から福島に向けて車を北上に走らせて福島に向かい、岸辺からできる限り多くのサンプルを持ち帰ってきました。
採取した海藻サンプルは、岩礁で生育していたもの、海岸に打ち上げられたもの、または、土産物店で食材として販売されていたものです。
二人の課題は、セーフキャストのプロジェクトとして、福島第一原子力発電所を中心点とした南北200キロメートルに渡る距離を1キロメートル間隔で海藻サンプルを採取しました。それは放射能検査のサンプルとして有効なものが陸からも効率的に収集できるかどうかを確認するためでした。
01-IMG_8163
ほとんどの海岸線は、復興の真っただ中でした。いろんな場所で海藻が見つかりましたが、海藻に近づくことはできませんでした。この日はたまたま満潮時刻が早かったのと、終日の高波も物理的な障壁となり、海面に近づくことができなかったからです。
02-IMG_8157
最初に海藻を採取したのは、1.5メートルほど飛び降りたところにあった、滑りやすいテトラポッド上でした。
サンプル採取はなかなか難しく、片手で海藻を搔きむしり、もう一方の手で握っていた袋にそれをすくい取って入れるという作業となりました…。
03-IMG_8161
… 採取した海藻を波にさらわれないように。
03-IMG_8161
浜辺に打ち上げられた海藻は、ごくほんの少ししか見つかりませんでした。これは海から50メートルほどのところに打ち上げられたものですが、湿った海藻の場合、1回のサンプルに必要な量は280グラムなので、この量では全く足りず、採取しませんでした。
03-IMG_8161
完成してまだ日の浅い港なので、一艘の船も碇泊していません … 。
03-IMG_8161
サンプルに最適な海藻を海中に見つけた、と思ったのですが……。
選択肢の一つとして、私たちのどちらか一方が海に飛び込んで採ってくるというのもあったのですが、海水はまだ冷たく、しかも遊泳禁止となっているこの場所から飛び降りてしまうと、戻ってくるのは不可能なのでやめました。
出発前に機転を利かせて、ウェットスーツや足ひれ、魚の陸揚げ使うさおなどを持ってくれば役に立ったでしょうし、長めの植木ばさみや剪定ばさみなども持ってくれば良かったのですけれども……。
実際のところ、何も持ってこなかったので、セーフキャスト魂に意識を集中させ、辺りを見回し、海藻を引き上げるのに役に立ちそうなものはないかと探してみました。
港周辺は整然とした状態でしたから、何かが落ちているとはそれほど期待していませんでしたが、それにしても網や棒、竿など周辺に転がっていても良さそうなものは全く見当たりませんでした。
ところが、一対の古長靴と……、片方に長い糸がついていてもう一方に鉄の重しがついた長い竹竿(写真の左上)が見つかったのです。
竹竿を見つけた瞬間、まさにその海藻を取り上げるのに最適な道具が横たわっていたので、目を疑いそうになったのですが、残念なことに、海藻はあまりにもしっかりと根を這っていて海底から引き剥がすことはできませんでした。
03-IMG_8161
成果が得られない無駄な立ち寄りが続きましたが、サンプル採集初日の終わり間際に、昔ながらの日本的な景色を目にすることが出来たのですが(風景がつまらないというわけではないのですが)、その日訪れた多くの場所と同様、海藻に近づくことは出来ませんでした。
橋を渡って離れ小島に渡ることは禁じられていまいた。それはおそらく2011年3月の津波で損傷を受けて以来、未だに修復されていないからではないかと思われます。
橋は掛かったままで、海藻も見えたのですが、波がまた高くなっていて採取することはできませんでした。
03-IMG_8161
2日目は天気に恵まれ、海も穏やかでした。(ここも防波堤設置工事中であることは明らかです。)この場所からも海藻は採取できませんでした。
03-IMG_8161
時折、波が押し寄せ、テトラポッドの半分ほどまで海水が被ったりしましたが、この場所の海藻は比較的簡単に採取できました。
03-IMG_8161
このボートの進水路からは、2つの海藻サンプルを収集しました。
ひとつは先端に生息していたもの、もうひとつは、恐らく海藻農家のところから流されてきたもののようです。
03-IMG_8161
2日目の終わりには、立ち寄った箇所全部の16%に相当する地点から10個のサンプルが集まりました。
海藻を乾燥機を使って乾燥させ、検査用にマルコ・カルトフェン氏の元に郵送しました。
試験的調査の結果は、 「どのサンプルも放射線量は均等に低く(1キロに対し、一桁レベルのベクレル数値)、検出はされなかった」でした。
全ての調査が完了したら、またセーフキャストのブログで更新します。
まとめ: 海岸でのサンプル収集試験的調査に関して、冬以外の季節に、または海が荒れていないときに船を出して採集するのがより効率的であろうという結論に至りました。
作者 ジョナサン・ワイルダー 翻訳 Akiko Hennmi
Links:
The full report
Feasibility Study — Seaweed sample collection Protocol
Sample Tracker
Collection Environment
=================