Safecast seminar in Iwaki

This is a guest post written by Ryuichi Mori, ex vice chairman of Dentsu and Advisor to MIT media lab.
On March 1, I was invited by Pieter and Joe of Safecast Japan to convene a radiation seminar in the City of Iwaki, Fukushima. The tsunami all but wiped out Fukushima Prefecture’s fishing industry. The nuclear accidents added further insult to injury. Fukushima’s fish markets have been effectively obliterated. Radiation levels in the area make recovery all the more difficult, and the fishermen continue to spend their days in port rather than out at sea.
Here is the situation that Fukushima is facing.This is a guest post written by Ryuichi Mori, ex vice chairman of Dentsu and Advisor to MIT media lab.
私は3月1日、Safecast Japan のPieter さんとJoeさんにお願いして、福島のいわき市で、放射線量のセミナーを開催していただきました。福島県は、津波で漁業が壊滅。追い打ちをかけるのが、原発事故です。福島産の魚の市場は事実上消滅してしまいました。多少の放射線量の減衰は、市場の復活には程遠く、漁に出るのを控える毎日が、今でも続いています。
魚や野菜の放射線量を測ることは出来ますが、仮に線量を毎日計測したとしても、福島のどこかで線量の高い野菜や魚が出現すると、市場全体で、県産の産物が販売困難な状況になってしますのが現実です。風評被害も出てきます。また生ものの放射線量を測る計測機は、非常に高額で、いつでも、どこでも、誰でもが計測することには、大きな壁になっているようです。
販売者も無く、購買者も無いとなると、漁には出られません。
それでも、何時海に出漁出来る日がくるのか、坐して待つしか無い深刻な状況がそこにはあります。
放射線量を計測することは、直接的にその問題の解決策にはなりませんが、毎日継続して何か所もの線量を計測し続けることで、ある判断の基準を作ることはできるのではないでしょうか。また魚の線量を計測するもう少し安価なカウンターが開発されれば、毎日色々な魚の線量を測り、毎日公表することで、市場、消費者に客観的な指標を提示できるようにもなるのではないでしょうか。風評へのカウンターデータを地道に示していくことも今のような出口のない状況を、少しでも展望のある方向へ導くことができるのではないでしょうか。
そんな問題意識で、いわき市へ出かけました。勿論動機は、Safecastの活動が、粛々と広域のありとあらゆる道路の線量を計測する活動を繰り広げていることに、刺激を受けたからです。
Safecastの活動をいわきの人々と共有したかったからです。
地元の新聞社の小磯さんの協力で、駅前の会議室を借り、新聞でも募集記事を書いていただき、定員一杯の30名の聴講者で開始されました。
約1時間のPieterさんの講演に続き、質疑応答に一時間。
熱心で専門的な質問が相次ぎ、充実したセミナーになりました。参加者の放射線量に関する知識の正確さ豊富さには、本当に感心しました。
Safecastの活動の大切さについても、理解が深まりました。参加者もSafecast側も共通の認識に達した大切なポイントは、出来るだけ多くの地点の線量データーを測り続けること、そのデーターを公表し、誰でもいつでも何処でも見ることができること、その結果一過性のデータに一喜一憂することなく、冷静な判断をする姿勢が育つことなどでした。
そして最後に生ものの線量を計測できる安価な線量計が、一日も早く開発され、漁業関係者へ台数が供給されるよう努力をするという視点も提起されました。データーが毎日市場へ示されて、安心して福島の港へ毎日魚が水揚げされる日が、一日も早く来ることを祈る気持ちは、参加者全員の思いであったことでしょう。
Safecastの活動は地味ですが、今のような原発被害の閉塞状況を
抜け出すための、策のひとつであり、大きな解決の一歩であることを認識した一日でした。 森 隆一
It is possible to monitor the radioactivity in fish and vegetables, but even if one were to do this every day, it’s a fact that the appearance of even a single highly radioactive plant or fish product somewhere would be catastrophic for the prefectural market as a whole. Harmful rumors swirl unchecked. And the cost of equipment needed to measure radioactivity levels in living beings is extremely high, presenting a serious hurdle for deciding when, who, and where to conduct testing.
Without sellers and consumers, there is no fishing industry. And so the fishermen of Fukushima bide their time waiting for the day they can once again put out to sea and ply their trade. It is an extremely trying time.
There are no major technical hurdles in the measurement of radioactivity itself. I feel that standards should be set based on continuous testing over a large number of sites. If cheaper Geiger counters can be developed to measure the radioactivity of seafood, the results could be announced daily, so as to give consumers an objective guide by which to make their decisions. Localities have taken the steps of measuring and posting readings on an ad hoc basis, but the prospects are dim for these unorganized efforts to guide us out of the current dark situation.
This is why I went to Iwaki. Of course, I was also motivated to promote and stimulate the quietly ongoing efforts of Safecast to measure and publicize radiation measurements on roadways over a broad area of the country. I wanted to tell the people of Iwaki about what Safecast is doing.
Mr. Koiso, a local journalist, helped arrange a suitable spot for a lecture at a hall near the station, and with the help of an article in his paper we convened the talk with a full house of thirty attendees.
First Pieter presented for an hour, followed by an hour-long question and answer session. The resulting series of passionate and highly technical questions made it a very successful seminar. I was moved by the accuracy and amount of information the participants had about radiation levels.
It also reminded me of the importance of Safecast’s efforts. The participants and Safecast members both agreed that the most important thing going forward is to continue measuring as many places as possible, to publicize this data so that anyone can see it, and to use the resulting transparency to replace the current cycle of hope and fear with a more measured and deliberate take on the situation.
This also reinforced my view that we need to develop a low-cost Geiger counter that can be distributed to fishermen as soon as possible. We are united in the hope for a day when the display of daily readings at markets will bring the peace of mind needed to allow Fukushima’s fishermen to resume their livelihoods once again.
But perhaps most of all, the day was a reminder that Safecast’s work is low- key but an important step towards helping those most affected by the nuclear accidents return to their normal lives once again.