The legal and ethical reasoning behind using CC0 for Safecast data

At Safecast.org, I pushed our team to use the CC0 public domain dedication for the data that we are collecting through our radiation measurements instead of a Creative Commons Attribution license, which would require by law that people give us attribution. The reason is that we must give people the flexibility to use the data as part of an analysis or service that would be encumbered or impossible with the attribution requirement.
Many large data aggregation projects would fail with the attribution requirement. For instance, if each person with each sensor had to be attributed and our data got rolled up into a massive analysis of all historical sensor data to find megatrends, it would be impossible to provide attribution to every single provider of data. Open data is essential to allow people to write software that uses the data freely and combines it with other data.
Providing the Safecast data under a CC0 public domain dedication does not, however, make it ethical for people to take all of the data from Safecast, re-skin it and present it as their own. To understand why this is true, one must understand the difference between what is ethical or normatively true and what is legally true.
Plagiarism is when someone takes someone else’s work and represents it as their own. In many cases, this is not illegal, just unethical. For instance, if I take someone’s idea and use it in my academic paper, or take Safecast data and make it look like I did it all myself, that would be plagiarism, not a copyright violation. It is unethical, but not necessarily illegal.
On the other hand, using a picture of Mickey Mouse in a presentation could be argued as an illegal copyright violation, but most would probably argue that it is ethical.
It’s very important to distinguish the difference between legality and ethics. Most of our society and our behavior is driven and guided by social norms and ethics. Just because something is legal, doesn’t mean it’s ethical.
In other words, just because you dedicate your data to the public domain, it doesn’t mean that you don’t have the ethical right to ask someone using your data to cite the source of the data on their website, just like you’d ask someone using your idea in their academic paper to give you credit for if they’d gotten it from you.Safecast.orgでは、我々が測定、収集している放射線量のデータについて、データ利用者による帰属先の明示を法的に求めるクリエイティブ・コモンズの著作権者表示(Attribution)ライセンスではなく、CC0のパブリックドメイン・デディケーションを用いることを私からチームに奨励した。理由は、著作権者表示が必要な場合には利用者にとって困難であったり障害であったりする、データ分析やサービスの一環としての利用の柔軟性を確保したかったからである。
著作権表示が必要だと、多くの大規模データ集約プロジェクトは破綻してしまう。例えば、仮にセンサーを携帯するすべての人の著作権表示が必要で、メガトレンドを見つけるための膨大な分析作業で、過去のすべてのセンサーデータが用いられ、その中に我々のデータが含まれるとしたら、データを提供したすべての人について著作権表示を行うことは不可能だろう。データを自由に使用してそのデータを別のデータと組み合わせるソフトウェアを開発するには、データがオープンであることは不可欠だ。
とはいえ、SafecastのデータをCC0パブリックドメイン・デディケーション下で提供したからといって、誰かがSafecastからのデータを丸ごと持っていって、見た目を張り替えて自前のものとして提示することが倫理的に正しくなるわけではない。この主張を正確に理解するには、倫理的に正しいということ、規範的に正しいということ、そして法的に正しいということの違いを理解する必要がある。
誰かが別の誰かの業績を自分のものとして提示するのが盗作だ。多くの場合、これは違法というわけではなく、非倫理的なだけだ。例えば僕が誰かの発想を盗んで自分の学術論文に使ったり、Safecastのデータを持ってって自分で全部やったみたいに見せかけたりすれば、それは盗作であって、著作権の侵害にはならないであろう。非倫理的ではあるものの、必ずしも違法ではない。
一方で、ミッキーマウスの画像をプレゼンテーションで使用したら、それは著作権侵害であり、違法だと主張できるだろう。しかしおそらくほとんどの人は倫理的には問題ないと言うだろう。
適法性と倫理性との違いを明確にするのはとても大事なことだ。我々の社会や行動の大部分は、社会的な規範と倫理によって牽引され、導かれている。適法だからといって倫理的とは限らない。
同様に、自分のデータをパブリックドメインにデディケートしたからといって、そのデータの使用者に対してデータの出典元をウェブサイトに記述するように要請する倫理的な権利がなくなるわけではない。それはちょうど、自分のアイディアを誰かが学術論文内で使う場合に、その旨の言及を要請するのと同じ話しだ。